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Fig. 28. Extrabranchial chloride cells in an Anguilla japonica larva (10 days after hatching), detected by whole-mount immunocytochemistry with anti-Na+/K+-ATPase fluorescently labeled and observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope (A). Chloride cells are distributed over the body surface of the larva, which lacks functional gills and gill chloride cells. Reprinted with kind permission from Springer Science + Business Media: Marine Biology, Positive buoyancy in eel leptocephali: an adaptation for life in the ocean surface layer. 156, 2009, 835–846. Tsukamoto K, Yamada Y, Okamura A, Tanaka H, Miller MJ, Kaneko T, Horie N, Utoh T, Mikawa N, Tanaka S. Figure 4. © 2009, Springer-Verlag. (Original photographs provided by Toyoji Kaneko of The University of Tokyo); A photograph of the anterior body region of a serrivomerid preleptocephalus (see Fig. 7C for whole body photograph) showing small whitish spots on the skin of the dorsal surface of the body, which could be chloride cells (B).

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